Dubrovnik

Called „the pearl of the Adriatic”, Dubrovnik is considered as one of the most beautiful cities of the world. It is one of the most powerful cities of the Balcans and a heritage of the 17th and 18th centuries architecture. It is a majestic city situated at the foot of the Srd mountain in the south of Croatia. The city and the seaport which has a rich history dating back to the Ancient Times, when it was nothing but a small village with a harbor called Ragusa. Visiting Dubrovnik is a cultural tour, during which you can try Croatian cuisine, take a walk along narrow streets of Stari Grad – Dubrovnik’s Old Town or drink a coffee in one of many small cafeterias in the city.
You can see lots of well-maintained monuments that will certainly make a great impression. Around the city there is a wall from the 9th century that used to defend the city against several invaders throughout the history. This is one of the best-kept walls in Europe that run almost 2 kilometers around the city. Dubrovnik abounds in many towers and fortresses. The fortress Lovrijenac, built on the rock of 46 meters, used to be the most important defensive point of the Republic. During the Dubrovnik’s Summer Festival you can see there a fascinating piece of theatre Hamlet. Located on the Stradun street, the main and the most beautiful street of Dubrovnik’s Old Town, the Sponza palace is a building from the 16th century, which connects renaissance and gothic structure. It houses the Archives of the Republic of Dubrovnik. The gothic Knezev Dvor, also known as Rector’s Palace, is one of the most beautiful monuments of Dubrovnik. Today it houses a museum. In atrium on the first floor we can see the bust of Miho Pracata, the citizen of Dubrovnik of outstanding merit. Gradski muzej is a city museum, where you can visit the rector’s apartment. In the of middle the Luza square you can see the Orlandov slup with the sculpture of warrior that is the symbol of free merchant city with own judiciary. Around the square there is a clock tower with belfry, rebuilt in 1902, town hall, National Theatre and the rests of arsenal, which is a cafeteria now. From the inside you can admire the view of the harbor and ferries going to the Lokrum island. On the Luza square, next to the main guard building, is situated the Mala Onofrijeva cesma, the well from the 15th century decorated with the paintings of Piero di Marino da Milano. At the other side of the entrance to the Old Town, you can notice characteristic round building – Velika Onofrijeva cesma – big well which is a popular place of meetings.
Dubrovnik is a city where you can find different faiths. Taking a walk around the city, you can see churches, synagogues and Orthodox churches. The southern side of the Luza square closes the Saint Vlah’s church, who is a patron of the Republic of Dubrovnik. The most interesting monuments are Saint Joseph church from 1667 and the Orthodox church from 1887, where you can admire wonderful collection of icons and reliquaries. Near to the Poljan Boskovic square there is the Jesuit Saint Ignatius church, which is worth seeing because of the paintings of Spanish painter Gaetano Gracia that is an example of the best Jesuit painting in Europe. Dubrownik has also a ghetto from the 14th century, where you can see a synagogue from the 15th century. This place is the second oldest construction like this in Europe. In the place of old Romanesque temple, that was destroyed by the earth quake, there was built the baroque Cathedral Velike Gospe. The project was done by Paolo Andreotti basing on roman constructions. Inside you can admire beautiful works of art, such as well- known painting of Titian Assumption of the Virgin. There is also an impressive reliquary of Saint Blaise made of gold and silver. Using a cable car, you can get to the top of the Srd mountain that towers the city. From the peak, you can take the pictures of the breathtaking landscape of Dubrovnik, Dalmatian coast and the Adriatic Islands nearby. In 1979, the city of Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

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